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Historical content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to industrialization and urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies, and reform movements, including civil rights.

Students examine the impact of geographic factors on major events and eras and analyze their causes and effects.

(4) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes.

Skills listed in the social studies skills strand in subsection (c) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies.

The student is expected to: (A) explain why significant events, policies, and individuals such as the Spanish-American War, U. expansionism, Henry Cabot Lodge, Alfred Thayer Mahan, Theodore Roosevelt, Sanford B. Du Bois on American society; and (C) evaluate the impact of third parties, including the Populist and Progressive parties. The student understands significant events, social issues, and individuals of the 1920s. The student understands the domestic and international impact of U. Roosevelt and Harry Truman during World War II, including the U. relationship with its allies and domestic industry's rapid mobilization for the war effort; (C) analyze the function of the U. Office of War Information; (D) analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons; (E) analyze major military events of World War II, including the Battle of Midway, the U. military advancement through the Pacific Islands, the Bataan Death March, the invasion of Normandy, fighting the war on multiple fronts, and the liberation of concentration camps; (F) evaluate the military contributions of leaders during World War II, including Omar Bradley, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas Mac Arthur, Chester A. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Berlin airlift, and John F. Source: The provisions of this 113.41 adopted to be effective August 23, 2010, 35 Tex Reg 7232. World History Studies (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012. Students shall be awarded one unit of credit for successful completion of this course. (1)World History Studies is a survey of the history of humankind.

Dole, and missionaries moved the United States into the position of a world power; (B) evaluate American expansionism, including acquisitions such as Guam, Hawaii, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico; (C) identify the causes of World War I and reasons for U. entry; (D) understand the contributions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) led by General John J. The student is expected to: (A) analyze causes and effects of events and social issues such as immigration, Social Darwinism, eugenics, race relations, nativism, the Red Scare, Prohibition, and the changing role of women; and (B) analyze the impact of significant individuals such as Clarence Darrow, William Jennings Bryan, Henry Ford, Glenn Curtiss, Marcus Garvey, and Charles A. Nimitz, George Marshall, and George Patton; and (G) explain the home front and how American patriotism inspired exceptional actions by citizens and military personnel, including high levels of military enlistment; volunteerism; the purchase of war bonds; Victory Gardens; the bravery and contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Flying Tigers, and the Navajo Code Talkers; and opportunities and obstacles for women and ethnic minorities. The student understands the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts in the Cold War on the United States. Kennedy's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis; (B) describe how Cold War tensions were intensified by the arms race, the space race, Mc Carthyism, and the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), the findings of which were confirmed by the Venona Papers; (C) explain reasons and outcomes for U. involvement in the Korean War and its relationship to the containment policy; (D) explain reasons and outcomes for U. involvement in foreign countries and their relationship to the Domino Theory, including the Vietnam War; (E) analyze the major issues and events of the Vietnam War such as the Tet Offensive, the escalation of forces, Vietnamization, and the fall of Saigon; and (F) describe the responses to the Vietnam War such as the draft, the 26th Amendment, the role of the media, the credibility gap, the silent majority, and the anti-war movement. The student understands the impact of the American civil rights movement. Due to the expanse of world history and the time limitations of the school year, the scope of this course should focus on "essential" concepts and skills that can be applied to various eras, events, and people within the standards in subsection (c) of this section.

A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together. free enterprise system within the parameters of this course and understand that this system may also be referenced as capitalism or the free market system. The student is expected to: (A) describe qualities of effective leadership; and (B) evaluate the contributions of significant political and social leaders in the United States such as Andrew Carnegie, Thurgood Marshall, Billy Graham, Barry Goldwater, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Hillary Clinton. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created.

Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. (5) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The student is expected to: (A) describe how the characteristics and issues in U. history have been reflected in various genres of art, music, film, and literature; (B) describe both the positive and negative impacts of significant examples of cultural movements in art, music, and literature such as Tin Pan Alley, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation, rock and roll, the Chicano Mural Movement, and country and western music on American society; (C) identify the impact of popular American culture on the rest of the world over time; and (D) analyze the global diffusion of American culture through the entertainment industry via various media. The student understands how people from various groups contribute to our national identity. The student understands the impact of science, technology, and the free enterprise system on the economic development of the United States.

Students trace the historical development of important legal and political concepts.

Students examine the history and impact of major religious and philosophical traditions.

Students analyze the connections between major developments in science and technology and the growth of industrial economies, and they use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of evidence.

(5) A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained by integrating social studies content and skills and by analyzing connections between and among historical periods and events.

The list of events and people in this course curriculum should not be considered exhaustive.

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(2) The following periodization should serve as the framework for the organization of this course: 8000 BC-500 BC (Development of River Valley Civilizations); 500 BC-AD 600 (Classical Era); 600-1450 (Post-classical Era); 1450-1750 (Connecting Hemispheres); 1750-1914 (Age of Revolutions); and 1914-present (20th Century to the Present).