Dating italo site b e

Posted by / 16-Sep-2020 00:32

Dating italo site b e

During WW1, the yard built 18 vessels, of combined 109,924 tons. 15, 1917, King George V & Queen Mary visited the 'Sir James Laing & Sons' shipyard, to support the yard's shipbuilding efforts during World War I. There are a number of WWW references to the ship being at Madras & Calcutta in those years & a reference to its bringing 125 personnel from Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) to South Africa to serve in the Boer War. there really is no meaningful WWW data re the vessel. Engaged on the Cape Town, Durban (Natal), Colombo & Calcutta service. Castriotti (or Castrioti), of Piraeus, Greece, & (3 says 1905) renamed Chariclia.

Some famous images of the visit resulted, particularly one of the King bending down to speak with a very young rivet heater or paintpot lad - of about 8 years old - beside a furnace similar to that visible in the 'Joseph L. I find the data re the two 1917 'rivet heater' images to be confusing. One of the 'rivet heaters' was John Cassidy, I believe, but which of the 2 images shows him? but read on) image, of the 'Robert Thompson & Sons Limited' shipyard in the foreground & of the 'Sir James Laing & Sons Limited' shipyard across the river with the Ayres Quay area behind it. 4, 1890, it would appear - owing to an accident, the vessel was suddenly stopped in her course before getting clear of the 'ways'. 6, 1902, Captain Grimm in command, the vessel was wrecked at Punta Guionos, Costa Rica, while en route from Puget Sound, Washington, U. I read however that the vessel was generally on charter to the Natal Emigration Department to carry Indian labourers, at 6 a head, to work in the sugar plantations of Natal & Transvaal. The vessel was sold, in 1898, to 'Paul & Shellshear', also of London. In 1907, it was again sold to 'Domestini, Oeconomou & Co.', also of Piraeus, & in 1912 renamed Leonidas.

John Laing (have not located an image of him) had a son named David, who had a short life indeed (c.1775-1796). In or about 1776, John was apprenticed at the North Sands yard of Mr. Wright, then the principal shipbuilder on North Sands. The U-55 crew then went below and closed the hatch and the boat got underway on the surface.

Philip had two daughters (May & Anne) who are not relevant to this Sunderland shipbuilding story, & also a son James who is most relevant, (Jan. In or about 1792, John went into business for himself at North Sands. A year later, John & his brother Philip, joined forces, a partnership which survived through 1818. 'Zyldijk'), 3 (Furness Withy), 4 (4 images Zijldijk & a plan), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Werner sailed about two miles then submerged the U-55 with the forty-one survivors still on the casing of the boat. the submarine dived and threw everybody in the water without any means of saving themselves, as the majority of them had had their lifebelts taken off them." Having taken their lifebelts and destroyed their lifeboats he now decided to just drown the entire crew, a clear act of cruelty and outright willful murder, and this was not the first time he had done this.

They purchased an old man-of-war, one of those "Leviathans," taken during the last war with the Dutch, and after cutting away all her superfluous timbers, converted her into a very useful floating dock for the repair of vessels.' On May 12, 1818, the John & Philip Laing partnership ended. I read that 3 of his sons worked at the Deptford yard. 19, 1860 (Queen Victoria being its first ship) & later filled in to make way for a fitting out quay (the dock gates apparently can be still seen to-day) and also (likely through 1818) a dry dock known as 'Cornhill' on the north bank of the river next to the Robert Thompson yard. 125.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. It read in part; "We will comport ourselves as Christians toward our enemies and conduct the war in the future as in the past with humility and chivalry."Wilhelm Werner sank a considerable amount of shipping and in 1918 he torpedoed and sank HMHS Rewa, a fully lit and marked hospital ship, fortunately only four people were killed.

John, then 64 years of age, left the partnership & set up a shipbuilding business (1818/c1830) at Southwick with his son James. James, it would seem, was the offspring of a second marriage for Philip? James was Chairman of the River Wear Commission for 32 years & a Director of the Suez Canal Company. 'Cornhill' dry dock continued to exist long after 1818 & is visible in an 1898 Ordnance Survey Map of Southwick Urban District. A most interesting postcard image was provided to the webmaster in Aug. Which image you can see in black & white here and in its original sepia here. The Lloyds's Register listings linked above, refer however to 'Levant Soc. I was unable to find any WWW references to this vessel & to its wreck. He tried to sink another Hospital Ship, the Guildford Castle, but because of a dud torpedo and a misfire he failed in this endeavor.

In 1793, David, his son, joined him in that business. David died very soon thereafter (in 1796, at just age 21. In 1804 they 'leased (or built)' a dry dock located on the N. Philip and John lived on Church Street, Monkwearmouth, near to the yard. He did the same thing with the crews of the Torrington on Apr. 12 to the crew of the Toro, despicable acts of murder on the high seas.

bank of the River Wear (Monkwearmouth) beside & to the immediate west of the first iron bridge, then in course of construction, i.e. A puzzle perhaps is that it is Philip Laing available for download is no longer so available) as then having a yard at Bridge Dock. When we read of such early days, I suspect that none of us, the webmaster included, understand how very tiny the early Sunderland shipbuilding enterprises truly were. The men in the water had little chance of survival and all but three died, but the three who survived were able to tell the tale of what happened to their fellow crewmen after they were picked up by a British patrol boat later in the day.

Not sure why Internet Explorer cannot identify the applet as being harmless). Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. JOHN LAING (1792), NORTH SANDS JOHN AND DAVID LAING (1793/1796), NORTH SANDS JOHN LAING (1796/1797), NORTH SANDS JOHN AND PHILIP LAING (1797/1805), NORTH SANDS & (1804/1818) BRIDGE DOCK JOHN & JAMES LAING (1816/c.1830), SOUTHWICK PHILIP LAING (1818/1834), DEPTFORD LAING & SIMEY (1834/1837), DEPTFORD PHILIP LAING (c.1837/1843), DEPTFORD JAMES LAING (became Sir James Laing in 1897) (1843/1898), DEPTFORDSIR JAMES LAING AND SONS LIMITED (1898/1966), DEPTFORDNote:- The token in the bottom row above is from an expired e Bay listing - a 'mudlark' find on the Wear river bank. 1909, to 'Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij' (Holland America Line), as part of the purchase of Neptune & renamed Zijldijk. The Master, Harry Hassan was taken below while the men on deck were searched.

Geoff indicates that he cannot spot any indication of another bridge behind the railway bridge. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Gayner, of Sunderland, who I now see still owned the vessel in 1908/09 per Lloyd's Register ('LR'). 1910, the vessel was dismasted off La Plata, Argentina, & was towed in that condition into Pernambuco, now Recife, Brazil, ii) that in Mar. Kirsten), of Hamburg, since the vessel was sold by them, in 1898, to 'Deutsche Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft Kosmos' (DDG Kosmos), also of Hamburg. The nearest island was 2 miles distant & at dawn a scouting party went to the island & sought help from 4 Maldivians gathering coconuts. It also was engaged, however, in other areas, including the carriage of cotton & grain from New Orleans, likely to Manchester.

Which would adjust the image dating to the late 1920s at the latest - since from 1927 to 1929 the road bridge with its distinctive arch was being built to replace the previous road bridge that had no arch at all. The image I show is not even, of the entire available image! You can see the whole set here & can see this particular image here. I suspect so.), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 69.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 226.5 ft. The webmaster has a single LR ex Google Books available to him which lists the vessel, see at left. 1911 the vessel was sold (to whom I wonder) with no change of vessel name, iii) that during WW1 Wychwood was used as a naval receiving ship off Kirkwall (Orkney Islands, I presume), iv) that she later became a barge & was broken up at about 1923. Soon they returned to the ship with eight small vessels intent not upon helping but rather upon looting Umona. 24, 1891, on service to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Acquired for the company's weekly freight service between Rotterdam & Baltimore, Maryland, U. While detail is not WWW available, the vessel stove in some plates at Latchford, & met with other accidents in the Manchester Ship Canal, either through bad steering, or bad pilotage. 28, 1894, the New York Times advised that both Venango & Govino (built by Laing of Sunderland, in 1892) were a week overdue at Baltimore, having encountered a storm on their voyages from Rotterdam. I read that the company ran into financial difficulties & in 1906 Furness Withy & Co. From 1 (item #26, page in Norwegian, Asp), 2 (2nd Onega), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).

What was then proposed was that a new company be formed & that the creditors accept shares in lieu of their debts. Was, in fact, a new company formed or was the existing company restructured? Per 1 [Bullard King, Umkuzi (1)], 2 (related ephemera), 3 (Boer War, 70% down, no date), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Per 1 [Bullard King, Umona (1)], 2 (Natal Line of Steamers, ex 3, Whitakers 1894, a 'Google' book), 4 (image), 5 (final voyage, Chapter 12, commencing at page #67), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).

The 'new company' was also, I read, named 'Sir James Laing and Sons Limited.'James Marr, [(1854/1932), later (1919) Sir James Marr, obituary etc.], an experienced shipbuilder who was Managing Director of Joseph L. 85.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LRMV. 85.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 281.5 ft.

dating italo site b e-44dating italo site b e-19dating italo site b e-40

At a site previously 'tenanted' by William Havelock. The University of Newcastle's 'Sine' project offers a print of the 'Laing' yard at Deptford in the period of 1825 to 1835. The vacated 'Bridge Dock' was later, it would seem, occupied by Mr. In the 1881 Census, I read that James was living at Thornhill Hall, Bishopwearmouth, with his wife, four sons, five daughters, & fourteen servants (14 more than I have! It depicted thousands of men (&some women) outside the Police Station & Magistrates Court in Sunderland, in an image which included an Empire Cinema poster with the date of Feb. The vendor indicated that it possibly related to a strike or protest meeting against unemployment as there was a depression in shipbuilding at that time. 12, 1908, Sunderland Town Councilcut off the electricity supplyto the shipbuilding yard of Sir James Laing as it owed them over 2,000. The vessel was used, I have read, in the fruit trade. di Nav a Vap.' as the registered owner in 1930/31 & 'Levant Parobrodarsko Drustvo s.o.j.' in 1931/32, both of ibenik, Yugoslavia now Croatia. 7, 1931, the vessel was wrecked in the Adriatic, nr. The vessel must have been re-floated since it was later broken up at nearby Pola (should be Pula, Croatia, I believe) in Q1 of 1932. He was charged with war crimes, but fled Germany and never faced trial.